About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CNNW 18
MSNBCW 16
KPIX (CBS) 3
MSNBC 3
CNN 2
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 59
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
grab by egypt's president. mohammed morsi is insisting he acted within the rights when he granted himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the word
that it is the only factor that will get mohamed morsi to be an honest broker in the region. i think it's much -- it would be a much better bet to appeal to his sense of wanting to be a statesman. wanting to be a responsible actor, wanting to be -- to live up to the stature of everything that egypt can be in the community of nations. i think threatening mohamed morsi in that way of all the things that are going to motivate him, i'm not sure threats like that, that we are going to take away $2 billion which again, i would say yes, it's a difficult economy. but it's not quite what it used to be. >> what about the imf and the $4.8 billion they have in reserves potentially for egypt? i mean, it's a linchpin of cash that could flow their way or not. >> again, these are all complicated issues. i still am not sure that threatening mohamed morsi is the way to get what you want done. >> so we reported yesterday senator mccain suggested sending former president clinton to negotiate a longer deal. he could be an honest broker that brought a lot of leverage and graf aas the to it. i spoke to debbie wasser
president mohammed morsi is meeting with the country's top judges to explain the extraordinary powers that he granted himself on thursday. among the decrees, judges cannot overturn any decision he makes or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
big question marks about egypt's new president. mohammed morsi, a long time member of the muslim brotherhood here in egypt and openly sympathetic to hamas which, of course, the u.s. considers a terrorist organization. and, yet, right now he is receiving high praise from u.s. officials for his mediation of this conflict. here is what secretary of state hillary clinton had to say. this is a critical moment for the region. government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a corner stone of regional stability and peace. notoriously fragile after eight dayings of fighting. the next 24 hours will be closely watched to see whether this truce has a chance. trace? >> steve harrigan live in what is now early morning live in cairo, egypt. the white house says president obama called israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and egyptian president mohammed morsi today. the president thanked them for working out a cease-fire deal but also said it's important to keep working on a more durable solution. a live update from the white house coming up on "the f
mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's something that mr. barak says that he wants to do for a long time but the recent operation by israeli forces in gaza delayed his announcement to do that. something he says he's been planning to do for a long time. this is a figure, as you mention, who's been in public office and public service for his entire
is a live look at tahrir square. group of hard-core demonstrators vowing to stay until until mohammed morsi invokes a decree granting himself absolute power. this is how bad the violence got. thousands clashing with police and morsi supporters and new pressure on the president to back down and fear that violence will flare up. steve? >> reporter: the number of those tents put up by protestors has grown. they are intent to stay there throughout the week but the number of protestors on the street has declined dramatically over the last 24 hours. on late friday there were up to 40,000 people on the square. the protests did turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be
of president mohamed morsi has been cancelled. overnight anti-government protesters clashed with police in cairo's tahrir square. they plan to press ahead with the demonstration today, demanding that morsi relent on his seizure of near absolute authority. he said the edict was temporary and only granted him limited authority. holly williams is in cairo. do we have any indication of what the president there is going to do? is he going to back down? >> good morning. well, president mohamed morsi is clearly trying to persuade people that he doesn't want to be a dictator. he met with a group of senior egyptian judges and he told them that his new immunity of the courts would only apply to sovereign matters. the problem with that is we don't know exactly what it means and it certainly won't be enough to satisfy his opponents. in fact, one of those judges described it as a frail statement. for president morsi's critics, they are still extremely angry about the series of decrees that he issued on thursday that give him greatly expanded power. >> meanwhile, protests continue where you are in ta
the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any decisions he made since june. the question was going into this meeting, would he scale back on some of those d
.com/empoweredpatient. ♪ ♪ >>> outrage against egyptian president mohamed morsi this hour shows no sign of dying down. thousands of demonstrators are still in cairo's tahrir square, venting opposition to morsi's move, granting himself sweeping new powers. that triggered days of violent protests throughout the country. some critics claim morsi, who is egypt's first freely elected president is trying to establish a dictatorship. morsi is meeting today with the country's highest judicial authority in a bid to defuse this crisis. reza sayah is live in cairo. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: john, let's bring you up to speed. as we speak, egyptian president mohamed morsi meeting with egypt's top judges, seven of them representing the supreme judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
jewelry. despite backing down on his controversial decrees egypt's president mohamed morsi faced another day of upheaval. huge crowds gathering in tahrir square and police crashed in the streets of cairo, scenes reminiscent of the revolution nearly two years ago. ayman mohyeldin has the latest. is this calming down at all, ayman? he made some concessions so there was a thought, perhaps, from morsi supporters that the protesters would begin to back down. doesn't seem so. >> well, you know, when we've been speaking to the people here in tahrir square and it boils down to an issue of trust. everyone here behind me will tell you they don't trust president mohamed morsi and the muslim brotherhood. they've experienced their rule in parliament and as a president and don't trust the words of the president. that's what we saw last night, president mohamed morsi coming out with a decree or statement following the decree controversial on thursday, came out after meeting with some of the judges saying he was going to use his new powers narrowly. the people think this is an attempt by the president a
a lot of time talking about who has a real impact this year i think would be mohammed morsi who is on their list of people to choose from the first democratically elected president of egypt that, i think it was very important moment in the middle east it was an ally of the united states and it really have l. have an impact on the future of the middle east. >> bill: so you think everybody is talking about mohammed morsi? is that what you are telling me? is he on everybody's mind. >> i know you are mad because i didn't say bill o'reilly. don't get nasty and lash out. [ laughter ] >> bill: morsey is morsi is a minor figure right now. >> no. >> bill: he he is he may emerge in a major figure in a bad or good way. he could broker peace that would be good. he could try to take over egypt and rule as islamic dictator. that would be bad. i don't think he is quite there yet. it's not an absurd contention. all right? but if that is the best we can do, if mohammed morsi is the person of the year on this planet, then we are in bad shape. what about you, kristen, who do you think should be pe
president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm swan song enabling the outgoing secretary of state to bask over her work in countrys like burma. instead, both spent much of their time in asia intensively dialing up mideast leaders. the president speaking with morsi three times in 24 hours. including aboard air force one on the way home to america. the president tan secretary both been on the phone, nonstop with regional leaders for a number of days. the purpose of her trip is to continue and intensify that engagement now face to face. >> the stakes for the president are enormous on the eaves of a second term. with analysts warping it may be the beginning of a much wider conflict between israel and iran. >> there is rise of al-qaeda and radical islam in the middle east that have taken advantage of the re-lutionnary change sweeping through the region. in the shadows here is
's president, mohamed morsi is saying that israel's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end in a few hours. our reza sayeh is there. we'll get an update from him this breaking story. we're right on the other side of this break with his report. >>> welcome back. breaking news to get to. we were hearing and we are waiting for a report from reza sayeh, what egypt's president mohamed morsi is now saying. he is saying that id real's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end some time today, maybe in a few hours and that egyptian-mediated efforts will produce positive results. reza sayeh is reporting for us on this issue. he joins us live. so, back up and give us some detail. is mohamed morsi really the person who would be able to effectively say that this aggression now ends? >> reporter: well, it's tough to say. what we do know is that it's intelligence officials in egypt that are apparently leading the negotiations and the man who is doing it is mohammed mashat. in 2011 he helped to negotiate the release of israeli soldier, which suggests this egyptian spy chief has pretty stron
president mohammed morsi on his flight back from cambodia with tom done lyn done donalan on. they are choosing their words carefully. >> they will improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> reporter: we know defense secretary leon panetta has had a conversation with his counterpart reiterating essentially the determination of the u.s. to stand side-by-side with the israelis to work together with them on israel's safety and security. ainsley: are white house officials now able to turn their attention to some more traditional matters? >> reporter: they are. the president of course could have a phone call or two if foreign leaders if they are warranted. for now we saw the president and the first family going to the washington area capitol food bank to handout meals to young people, and also the elderly. more traditional activities for the first family. they were joined by the oregon state basketball team which is coached by the first lady's brother greg robinson. the president says thanksgiving is a chance to put it all in perspecti
in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed morsi, it is a big test for the new leader. steve harrigan is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty
, including president mohamed morsi. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu, thanked morsi for his efforts to help broker the cease-fire. speaking to the israeli prime minister, president obama reaffirmed the united states and said it would use the moment to help israel strengthen security needs especially dealing with the issue of arms and weapons being smuggled into gaza. president obama in talking to president morsi, again, thanked him for his role and talked about the need to try to create and achieve a broader security situation in the region. president obama certainly spent a fair amount of his day yesterday dealing with this. the white house saying that secretary of state hillary clinton did play a pivotal role. one of the key things that they are pointing to that has come out of all of the talks and negotiations, alex, there's a question mark surrounding the egyptian president mohamed morsi, and that question mark has gone away. fe feel president obama's relationship has gotten stronger. he has been talking to him throughout this entire process over the past several days and they f
will head to cairo where she'll have face-to-face meetings with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> want to begin with reza sayah, live for us in cairo. she mentioned in her comments that she is on her way to have meetings with the egyptian president, morsi, at the same time, offering any assistance that israel might need. tell me a little bit about the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israe
, opponents rallied against mohamed morsi, he met with the senior judges monday trying to quiet the dispute over his effort to assume near absolute power. holly williams is in cairo. good morning holly. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. he met with several senior judges and told them that one of his new powers immuneity from the court would only apply to sovereign matters. the problem is that we don't know exactly what that means. it certainly won't satisfy his opponents. they're holding a large demonstration today in tahrir square, right behind me. you'll remember the square from last year's egyptian revolution which ousted the country's long-time dictator. one of the organizers of today's demonstration told me he is expecting half a million people. that seems ambitious. at the moment there are only a few thousand people out. some of president's morsi's supporters were planning a gathering but canceled that because they were afraid of clashes. we may see more violent confrontations as we have over the last few days. norah, charlie? >> holly, thanks. >>> hum
turmoil in egypt. and took to the streets of cairo to protest mohammed morsi to give themself new powers and a look there and at the white house. a troop the incident at the gaza border and involves gunfire and one death. a special report from washington, now, back to new york and "the five." ♪ >> r.e.m., if the end of the world is coming these people will be ready. and there's a new show, and features americans who are convinced the apocalypse is coming. >> i'm preparing my family for the total destruction. >> a devastating earthquake, a series of catastrophic terrorist attacks. >> on the doomsday scenario i'll be the only one standing there with another hundred pounds to lose. >> 241 pounds of cucumbers. >> and one for every individual in the house. >> and this is the life style we live. >> dana this is the second season of the show and that's with all that was in this nuclear age that we're in, weapons of mass destruction, and every other sentence and shows like this, isn't it about time for a show like this to emerge as a viable opportunity and a learning segment for america. >>
-fire deal brokered largely over the phone. president obama and the president of egypt, mohamed morsi, apparently making a real connection to stop the carnage. i want to begin our coverage here of the very fragile truce with arwa damon live with us this morning in gaza city. arwa, i think i hear horns honking. is the celebration there continuing where you are? >> reporter: it is. although the crowds have tapered off a little bit. but it is pretty incredible when you look at the street down below us and compare it to what the situation was like 24 hours ago, when you would hardly see a single person outside and most of the shops were shut. you can see very close to where people were gathering, celebrating what they're calling a victory. just one of the many locations that were bombed during this most recent conflict. that was, in fact, a residential home. the israelis, when they struck it later on, saying that they believe that it was being used by a senior hamas commander as an intelligence operations center. but people, ever since the cease-fire was announced, were taking to the stre
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
of the blame, mohamed morsi appears to lay some blame on the israelis. is he torn with his fellow islamists and the need to maintain the treaty obligations with israel? >> martin, if he isn't yet, he could be soon, and that's, of course, the real danger here. if this thing goes on just for a short time, then maybe we wind up okay. but if it goes on for days or weeks, like the 2008-2009 war that ambassador ginsberg referred to, then i think all bets are off as to just how long the egyptian regime can really sustain this stance of sort of being between the two. you know, in a broader sense, of course, the cease-fire that hamas had respected for a number of years never reflected a fundamental strategic change by hamas. it was more a temporary recognition that fighting the what i they had been before wasn't doing them any good. on the other hand in their own eyes, the cease-fire isn't doing them any good either. and so i think they're willing to maybe, as mark ginsberg said, maybe, you know, roll the dice a little, hope with the morsi government in place, maybe things can be different and maybe
, forging new relations with rob morrison -- mohamed morsi, seeing how the arab world is post the arab spring. testing hezbollah and testing president obama, who interestingly immediately threw his lot in with israel. the president didn't say we want to call for cessation of hostilities and calm, he said we agree with israel's right to defend itself. israel's real enemy is iran. if remember netanyahu was at the u.n. holding up his bomb chart. he wasn't talking about hamas. he was talking about iran. that is israel's overriding threat. they have been able to deal with hamas pretty handedly. i've seen just yesterday israeli warships able to take out a single hamas militant who was sitting in a chair by the waterfront. so one warship fired a rocket. you could barely see the ship on the horizon and take out an individual militant. israel has been telephoning the houses of neighbors of hamas militants and telling them to get out of their houses. it has their phone numbers. so there is something suspicious about this. israel has too much intelligence on hamas, has been able to deal with hama
in the summit meetings then. from there, he spoke with benjamin netanyahu and mohamed morsi about ongoing fighting in ga gaza. and hostess isn't liquidating just yet. they'll be in mediation to work out differences. back to "hardball." >>> we're back. according to some reports, the president could name a successor to hillary clinton as early as next week. i think it could come this week. it's a decision fraught with risk. "the new york times" reported yesterday that the white house aides say the president's favored candidate is susan rice, the current ambassador to the u.n. but republicans like senator john mccain and lindsey graham have threatened to filibuster her nomination thanks to her appearances on tv following the benghazi attacks. would the president risk starting off his second term with a decision that would likely lead to a bitter confrontation fight? richard wolffe is vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com. he's also an msnbc political analyst. and jay newton-small is a diplomatic correspondent for "time." richard, i want to get your sense of the president's thinkin
administration officials that the president's relationship with mohamed morsi really got stronger throughout this process. so, they're encouraged by that. they are also saying secretary clinton really played a key role in these negotiations, so they are cautiously optimistic. >> two thoughts on that. i mean, obviously, secretary clinton's role, it was, you know, a high-risk decision to send her there. she's managed to come away with a deal. obviously, she and the president deserve a tremendous amount of credit. also this idea of strengthening the relationship with morsi because what i've heard from administration officials is they're concerned they haven't had the leverage with morsi they may have had with the previous head of egypt. are you picking that up as well? >> reporter: absolutely. and i think that was the concern sort of entering this process of trying to broker a cease-fire. of course, the relationship with morsi is quite different than it was with mubarak. they didn't know how this was going to play out. we saw that president obama was in continuous talks with morsi. he spoke wit
this country a corner stone of regional stability and peace. >> seemingly unexpected leader was egypt's mohamed morsi, a man we've seen at rallies where egyptians chan egyptians chanted we are hamas. it's an impressive feat and the first time that israel has ever negotiated with an islamist government. but there are some shady things about the deal. according to an israeli newspaper, neither side officially signed penned to paper on the cease-fire agreement which raise sometimes questions about it. and here's what we know is in the verbal deal. israel has agreed to hold its fire and end attacks against top militants and this is important, promise to look at ways to ease its blockade of the gaza border. hamas agreed not to strike any israeli targets and agreed there is no passage of weapons into gaza and to insure other palestinian groups in the gaza strip stop their attacks. if you're shaking your head that some of these things are very tall order, well, you're right. later "out front" we have the key players, israel's foreign deputy minister and leerd of the plo to the united states. they will
earlier, the real man to watch here is mohammed morsi who is the safeguard, the guarantor of the hamas side of the cease fire agreement. he will be one of the key factors over there in 48 hours, 72 hours about whether or not this cease fire holds. all indications now in the morning new york time looked very dicey. i think it's been two or three hours. it seems like everybody is not going to hopefully turn this into a cease fire breaking event. we'll have to see. >> you talked about mow home home whom mid morsi. when it comes to enforcing what's happening miles away along this border, who is it that will do this? who is it that judges, yousef, whether it's a violation? >> sure. the bigger problem is it was very big. the other part of the problem is while the egyptians have good relations with israel and hamas, they have far more leverage over hamas. the so-called buffer zone that we see is exclusively on territory inside gaza. there's no buffer zone on the israeli side. there's no protection for the people of gaza from the israelis. that so-called buffer zone takes up 50% of the arabal
: president mohamed morsi, gave himself almost unchecked powers and sent thousands into the streets, the people who have been helping to topple hosni mubarak, now, who they are calling the new egyptian pharaoh. are we headed for a you new islamist coup and islamist state in egypt. >> it could be headed that way and also could be headed back to a military takeover, if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there is continued chaos. i'll never forget, chris, after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square, and, a young woman said, senator mccain it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. that is what we have to worry about, a repeat of the iranian experience in the 1970s, and -- but, what should the u.s. be doing, saying, this is unacceptable and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you p
president mohammed morsi stood by his decision to essentially give himself complete control over egypt. he says it's only temporary. you may recall last week he issued several decrees. including an order that all decisions he makes are final. and one that states no legislature and no court can overturny law that he makes. if that sounds like a dictatorship to you, it does to these people, too. they are pro-democracy protesters who have responded to days of clashes that have led to one death and hundreds of injuries. all of this less than two years after a popular uprising ousted hosni mubarak. the white house has not spoken with the ejimtion counter part since his power grab but they are keeping a close eye on the situation. >> we have raised concerns. i think the state department put out a statement on this or new one addressed it in a briefing. i think the state department might have more information for you on, you know, specifically how we have communicated those concerns. but, you know, our interest is in the process, the transition towards democracy. >> shepard: also today secretary
jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculated. he thought in the aftermath of brokering a ceasefire between israel and hamas, that gave him a new standing internationally, gave him new stature in the region, and it did and he could somehow use that to convert it into new power within egypt himself. what he's finding is in fact the new egypt is an eg
me. >>> more protests in egypt. hours before a huge rally against mohamed morsi. many had been camping out for the demonstration against the president who issued several decrees last week that gives him almost absolute power. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> if you read only one thing this morning, in an effort to keep you all hip on emerging trends, the latest trend in tv entertainment. 20-something virgins. the daily beast points out these story lines are actually reflecting real life. it's up on our facebook page at facebook/jansingco. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to cre
the new president. tear gas was fired to disperse demonstrators. many say mohamed morsi betrayed the democratic intention of arab spring when he granted himself sweeping new powers last week. we'll keep an eye on cairo and bring you new developments as they happen. >>> as early as today, we could hear from the u.s. soldier accused of leaking thousands of military and diplomatic secrets to wikileaks. bradley manning says military jailers mistreat ed him for nearly a year. if his attorneys can prove that, his case could be dismissed. if not, manning could face life in prison if convicted. >>> also this morning, forensic experts have what they need to determine if former palestinian leader yasser arafat may have been poisoned eight years ago. just hours ago, they exhumed his body, took samples from the remains and then reburied him. fred pleitgen has been following the developments from the west bank. morning, fred. >> reporter: good morning, carol. the process only lasted a few hours. early in the morning hours, the grave, the tomb of yasser arafat was opened, all of this closed of
this is where they will remain until president mohamed morsi backs away from his controversial decree, which says no person, no authority can overrule his decisions until a new constitution is put in place. >>> tissue samples from yasser arafat's body are in the hands of forensic experts. his grave was opened today in ramallah. samples were taken from his remains. the exact cause of the former palestinian leader's death has long been a mystery. now testing will be done to find out if arafat was in fact poisons. >> the indications we have or the convictions we have that israel have done this assassination but yet we still need evidence. >> israel meantime denied those allegations. >>> a fiery scene in downtown sydney, australia, today. look at this with me and you'll see a cab, look at this, of a construction crane engulfed in flames, black smoke. it gets worse. because this is the moment when the crane, this arm here collapses, falls into a building, barely misses the busy street below. here's where the story gets a little bit more intriguing. the operator of the crane was also the manager o
a new decree by president mohammed more see an morsi and his government thaebgs eplts them from judicial review. the president spoke out to the crowd in front of the presidential palace today. he insists his new decree is only temporary and is designed to keep supporters of hosni mubarak from blocking his reforms. kt mcfarland joins us, and wahil farris is also with us. moris' decree is not sitting well with a lot of people. they say he is a dictator and demanding him to resign. >> he is. he's got control of the legislature he's the president. he has control of the executive branch and the military now. a couple of months ago the mail tear remade some shaeupbgs, h shakeups. if you can't take over the judicial branch make sure it doesn't have the authority to go after him. why is this important to us? eegypt is about to hit its fiscal cliff. it has economic crisis on the horizon. they can't feed their people, they can't give them fuel. they don't have transportation fuel and without foreign assistance the egyptian government and morsi himself will face a lot more demonstrations. people we
was the first administration official to meet egypt's president, mohamed morsi, after his historic election. and now by elevating him to peace broker the u.s. is supporting a young islamist president who has struggled to consolidate control of his own country. >> did the u.s. have to make any deals or concessions to make this happen? >> peace comes with a price. morsi's help here is going to get egypt around $450 million in emergency cash. congress may release those funds in the coming weeks, according to administration source. house appropriations committee froze that money in september after the president had already pledged it. the white house is also going to ask congress to increase financing for israel's iron dome defense system. the u.s. gave israel about $3 billion in military financing this year. so the big picture an official at state tells me that this effort was about stopping the killing, not launching a mideast peace process for the obama administration. a senior israeli official told me give it one to two more days before you call this an agreement. isra
power grab by their democratic leader. earlier we saw violent clashes as president mohammed morsi said the far reaching powers he just granted himself, basically saying he can ignore the courts are just temporary. the thousands gathered in the streets of kaj roar not so sure. they are making their doubts known with a round of protests this afternoon. coming up we will speak with ralph peters about what happened to the promise of democracy in this country and what the rice of a powerful group of islamic hard liners means to america. ralph says the future of egypt is literally on the line today. there was also some breaking news a couple of hours ago in the fast and furious investigation, that's the gun-running sting operation gone bad. and then the probe that led to a multiyear knock down drag out fight between congress and the department of justice, the one wanting the documents and the facts, and the department of justice not wanting to turn it all over. you may remember that attorney general eric holder was sued for more documents on the program that wound up funneling thousands of w
for life. only from aveeno. egypt's tahrir square. they say that they are going to stay there until mohamed morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee re
's leader is part of the muslim brotherhood, clearly on the palestinian side. mohamed morsi reaching out to president obama and saying, we consider this an act of aggression on israel's part. and this must stop. how does this endanger the entire region now that egypt's sort of been sucked into all of this? >> reporter: well, everyone here knew that the arab spring really changed things here. and now that you're seeing the leadership in egypt starting to make maneuvers -- everybody was waiting to see how that leadership was going to act towards israel. as you know, they've had a peace treaty for dozens of years. when morsi got into power, he said he would leave the peace treaty alone. however it gives you some idea of how things are changing. there certainly is concern on israel's part. they certainly do not want to be at war with a bunch of different people, surrounded by different countries, that they do not git along with. they already have deteriorating relation with his turkey and now you're seeing egypt. we know for a fact that egypt pulled its ambassador to israel out of israel yes
, confident that the egyptian president mohamed morsi can deliver right now? >> reporter: i've been told by one senior administration official that they are confident. that they feel like egypt has some skin in the game and really does not want to see this escalate. but the thing is looking to for instance to september this official told me they feel like egypt has come through on small tests. when more security w at the embassy in september because of protests there, egypt came through. of course that's on a very small scale, wolf. and the thing is this post-mubarak era, the equation is very different. the u.s. has somewhat of a relationship with the muslim brotherhood ruling egypt, but it is largely untested in a big way at this point. so this is really seen as the big test. there is a bit of a question mark, but yes, i'm told that they are confident that for now egypt can help them. >> let's see if they can. brianna keilar over at the white house. thanks. let's bring in our chief white house correspondent john king. the president's in a tough position right now whachlt can he effectiv
.s. and also across much of the western world. additionally, she knows that egyptian president mohammed morsi, with whom she is meeting right now, is under tremendous political pressure at home because he is a member of the muslim brotherhood, which is closely aligned with hamas. he can't be seen at home as giving away too much for the israelis -- to the israelis, i should say. the israelis for their part want a long-term peace, not short-term cease fire. here is netanyahu. >> now, if there is a possibility of achieving a long-term solution to this problem through diplomatic means, we'd prefer that. but if not, i'm sure you understand that israel will have to take whatever action is necessary to defend its people. >> secretary clinton for her part standing steadfast with israel. here she is. >> president obama asked me to come to israel with a very clear message. america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering. that is why we believe that it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. the rocket attacks from terrorist organizations inside gaza on israeli cities an
mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt. what happens if they fail to reach any kind of compromise here? >> reporter: well for the past four days
to president mohamed morsi and the muslim brotherhood. and wondering if they replaced one dictator with another this morning. this ireport showing protesters as they carry the 16-year-old's casket through tahrir square yesterday. intense protests expected again today. morsi declaring egypt's courts cannot overturn decisions he's made since coming into office in june. or over the next six months. one opponent says that can only lead to a dictatorship. morsi has said he's trying to protect egypt's fragile arab spring revolution. he's not trying to accumulate unchecked power. >>> the body of former palestinian leader yasser arafat was exhumed this morning from a mausoleum in the west bank. a team of international scientists will analyze tissue samples in an attempt to determine if he was poisoned to death in 2004 with a radioactive substance. the actual cause of arafat's death was never actually determined. >>> the current head of the palestinian authority travels to the united nations this week for what he hopes will be a vote with a historic outcome. mahmoud abbas, will be present thursday as th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)